Breath Work 2018-06-17T17:26:03+00:00

WHY BREATH WORK?

You have a very accessible tool to transform and optimise your health and performance.

Your breath.

We’ve studied and distilled ancient and modern breath practices to bring you their core principles.

State: Change your breath, change your state.

State is the condition of your mind and body. The way you breathe directly influences your state. Taking conscious control over your breath will help you manage stress, improve your mental game, control your energy output, have the edge and improve your decision making.

Mechanics: Position your body to optimise every breath.

Learning to move your body well in a way that best utilises the air you breathe is crucial to optimising performance. If you can’t breathe in a position you need to improve that position. The foundation is to start using your nose to breathe instead of your mouth. This changes your position, the muscles used to breathe and how you use oxygen.

Physiology: Regulate the processes going on inside your body.

Use your breath to control your blood chemistry, your pace and your energy output. This enables you to create specific health and training adaptations. The central piece we focus on is developing your tolerance to CO2.

Use the resources below to learn how to apply these principles in any situation to optimise your performance.

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

PSE PRO Plus Breathe Programs
LEARN MORE
Art of Breath Clinic
LEARN MORE
Breath Assessment
LEARN MORE
breath calculator
LEARN MORE
PSE PRO
LEARN MORE
Art of Breath Online Course
COMING SOON

WATCH

View our Breath Work Playlist
on 
YouTube

*Click the top left of the video screen to see the full playlist and select a different video

ARTICLES

WHERE DO I START WITH BREATH WORK
Read
EVOLUTION OF THE ART OF BREATH
Read
ACCESS YOUR PERFORMANCE POTENTIAL
Read
USING BREATH TO KNOW OURSELVES
Read
EXPERIMENTS IN THE ART OF BREATH
Read
TRAINING BENEFITS OF NASAL BREATHING
Read
THE NOSE KNOWS
Read

PODCASTS

what got you there podcast
Listen
zestology podcast
Listen
collective insights
Listen
180 Nutrition Podcast
Listen
altis podcast
Listen
endurance planet podcast
Listen
the airborne mind
Listen
the airborne mind
Listen
renegade radio
Listen
beyond the kill
Listen
onnit
Listen
the airborne mind
Listen

BOOKS

THE OXYGEN ADVANTAGE BOOK
Check it Out
RECOGNIZING AND TREATING BREATHING DISORDERS
Check it Out
BREATHE BOOK
Check it Out
SHUT YOUR MMOUTH AND SAVE YOUR LIFE
Check it Out

WEBSITES

WIM HOF METHOD WEBSITE
Learn More
HOLOTROPIC BREATHING WEBSITE
Learn More
NORMAL BREATHING WEBSITE
Learn More

RESEARCH

Brain/Breath Connection

Star-Like Cells May Help The Brain Tune Breathing Rhythms

Dedicated area in brain for respiration

How Breathing Calms Your Brain, And Other Science-Based Benefits Of Controlled Breathing

Ultra-slow mechanical stimulation of olfactory epithelium modulates consciousness by slowing cerebral rhythms in humans

Inner workings of the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC)

Breathing, Fear, Panic and Anxiety

Breathing reduces panic and anxiety

The relationship between dlPFC activity during unpredictable threat and CO2-induced panic symptoms

Reducing State Anxiety Using Working Memory Maintenance

Effect of Threat on Right dlPFC Activity during Behavioral Pattern Separation

Describing the interplay between anxiety and cognition: From impaired performance under low cognitive load to reduced anxiety under high load

Phasic vs Sustained Fear in Rats and Humans: Role of the Extended Amygdala in Fear vs Anxiety

New treatment succeeds in reducing panic and anxiety

Stress helps unlearn fear

Meditate regularly for an improved attention span in old age

Oxygen and Cancer

Prognostic significance of tumor oxygenation in humans

Nasal Breathing & Exercise

Increased Nitric Oxide Concentrations.

Nose breathing may indirectly determine arterial oxygenation.

Nose breathing increases arterial oxygen tension.

Comparison of maximal oxygen consumption with oral and nasal breathing.

Nasal breathing better recruits the primary and accessory respiratory muscles

Diaphragmatic amplitude and accessory inspiratory muscle activity in nasal and mouth breathing adults: A cross-sectional study.

Diaphragmatic breathing reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress

Respiratory Water Loss

On average, subjects could reach 90% of max workload while nasal breathing.